Categories
Art theory Faces Oil Painting Painting Portrait

Color Boot Camp Part II: Saturation Study #4: Low to Moderate Saturation

Color Boot Camp SATURATION: Neutral Areas vs. Saturated Areas, 11x14" oil study
Color Boot Camp SATURATION: Neutral Areas vs. Saturated Areas, 11×14″ oil study

In this last  Saturation exercise in the New Masters Academy Color Boot Camp series, the Major Key is low with so much black background. The most contrast of saturation or Minor Key comes in her red dress. I was happy with the way my study proceeded, without too much struggle, and how it turned out. It was easier to paint because there was more contrast in the reference photo.

Below are the reference photo and Mr. Perkins’ 30 minute study.

 

Categories
Art theory Faces Oil Painting Painting Portrait

Color Boot Camp Part II: Saturation Study #3: High Saturation

Color Boot Camp SATURATION: Neutral Areas vs. Saturated Areas, 11x14" oil study
Color Boot Camp SATURATION: Neutral Areas vs. Saturated Areas, 11×14″ oil study

This Color Boot Camp, Saturation exercise, like the previous one, is about painting in a high major and minor key. The High Major Key means that overall the greater proportion of the image (the background) is very saturated. The Minor Key, or range of contrast of saturation, is also high because if the contrast between the highly saturated background and her shirt and her skin tones are moderately saturated.

The underlying drawing and so the painting itself is rather awkward and not a great likeness but I was going for value and saturation. The reference photos with flat lighting and without strong shadows are the hardest to draw and paint since there is no contrast showing the bone structure or planes that give a three-dimensional look to a painting.

Below are the reference photo and Mr. Perkins’ 30 minute study. Again I love the way he simplifies and makes a “painting” without worrying about making a “portrait” on an exact person.

Categories
Art theory Faces Oil Painting Painting Portrait

Color Boot Camp Part II: Saturation Study #2: High Saturation

Color Boot Camp SATURATION: Neutral Areas vs. Saturated Areas, 11x14" oil study
Color Boot Camp SATURATION: Neutral Areas vs. Saturated Areas, 11×14″ oil study

Continuing in the New Masters Academy Color Boot Camp series, this second Saturation exercise is about painting in a high major and minor key. The High Major Key means that overall the greater proportion of the image is very saturated. The Minor Key, or range of contrast of saturation, is also high. As you can see, the background is very neutral relative to her blouse and skin tones.

I was very happy with the way my study turned out. I spent closer to 3 hours than 30 minutes but the session went very well without much struggle.

Below are the reference photo and Mr. Perkins’ 30 minute study. I love the way he simplifies and makes a painting without worrying about painting this exact person.

 

Categories
Art theory Faces Oil Painting Painting Portrait

Color Boot Camp Part II: Saturation Study #1: Low Saturation

Color Boot Camp: SATURATION. Overall Low Saturation, Study 2, 11x14" oil
Color Boot Camp: Saturation. Overall LOW Saturation, Study 1 v.2, 11×14″ oil on Dura-Lar

In each of Bill Perkins’ New Masters Academy Color Boot Camp courses, he introduces one aspect of color (e.g. Value, Saturation, Complements, Temperature), demonstrates and explains further with a quick oil study of the same model in different color/lighting situations. I tried this one twice (second version above, first below) because even though he emphasizes these assignments are NOT meant to be portraits, I’m as interested in learning to capture a likeness as I am color. I did a better job on the positioning of her head and getting a likeness in the second one, above. (See bottom of post for reference photo and teacher’s rendition.)

Color Boot Camp: SATURATION. Overall Low Saturation
Color Boot Camp: SATURATION. Overall Low Saturation, Study 1 v1

Mr. Perkins uses the concepts of Major Key and Minor Key for each color topic. In Saturation, the Major Key describes the Level of saturation—how intensely saturated the colors are in the greater proportion of the image. The Minor Key represents the Range of contrast between neutral gray and the most saturated color in the image. This first study in saturation is supposed to represent a Low Major and Minor Key.

I was confused at first by how highly saturated the model’s face seemed to be with her very rosy cheeks and golden skin. But after getting some valuable feedback from the teacher, I now understand that the Major Key is Low because the proportion of saturated color (her cheeks) to neutral areas (the rest of the painting) is small; and the Minor Key is Low because the range of saturation from neutral to the moderately-saturated pink in her cheeks is also fairly low.

Below are the photo reference, my paintings,  and the teacher’s study. He painted her skin tones much darker than I did. Maybe I need more study with value?  I can see how I could have gone a little darker but not as dark as he did. Coming up next, Study 2 with very saturated High Major and Minor Keys; just the opposite of this one.

Categories
Art theory Faces Oil Painting Painting People Portrait

Revised Post: Color Boot Camp Monochrome Studies

Color Boot Camp Part I Monochrome. Left to right: Color reference photos, B&W converted ref photo, my two studies
Color Boot Camp Part I Monochrome. Left to right: Color reference photos, B&W converted ref photo, my two studies

When my art friend Chris Beaven commented on the previous version of this post that it would be interesting to see my studies compared to the black and white versions of the photo references, I did a virtual dope slap (Of course! What a perfect way to see if I got the values right!) and then decided to redo this blog post to show that comparison (above).

While I often convert color photos to black and white to see the values, when I did these studies from Bill Perkins’ Color Boot Camp on New Masters Academy I wanted to try to do the conversion in my artist brain instead of using technology. But putting my studies next to the converted photos gives me just the reality check I needed. I can see that I did pretty well in painting the values from the color photos.

In the lesson he set up one model in four different lighting situations and then demonstrated doing a 30-minute painting of each in black and white. He recommends doing the studies in no more than 30 minutes, emphasizing that it’s more important to do many starts, without worrying about getting a likeness or making finished paintings. I have to admit spending longer than 30 minutes, probably up to 3 hours on some, and in retrospect, the longer I worked the less effective the study was.

If you want to see Bill Perkin’s studies and mine in greater detail, click the “read more” link below.