Dawn View from my Scottsdale hotel window, ink & watercolor 5x8"
Dawn View from my Scottsdale  hotel window, ink & watercolor 5x8"

Dawn View from my Scottsdale hotel window, ink & watercolor 5x8"

I was too excited to sleep much during my week at the Scottsdale Artists School, despite my quiet, comfortable hotel room. One morning I woke as the sun was coming up, with the moon still shining brightly. Everything outside my window was glowing so I immediately grabbed my sketchbook and paints. What a great way to start the day, even if on only a few hours sleep.

I promised to share what I learned from Rose Frantzen but after typing up 5 pages of notes, I’m not sure they will be helpful to anyone without having been there and seen her working and guiding us. That said, here is a bit of my notes:

  • “I paint what I see, I don’t paint what I don’t see.”  If it’s blurry and you can’t tell what it is, paint it blurry (soft edges), don’t guess, don’t “know,” just paint what you see.
  • Before starting a painting ask yourself, “How does the pose/subject make you feel; what is the story; what is your impression of the subject; what is the purpose of your painting? Be sensitive to self, that is your real teacher.
  • Don’t waste time painting stuff you’re not interested in. But you don’t have to like the pose or the subject, that tension is OK to paint.
  • Start with the easiest shape or color to see; in a portrait usually the forehead and/or the “keystone” (the shape between the eyebrows and top of nose). Make the keystone your anchor and keep returning to it, comparing other areas to it for color/value/size.
  • Look at your painting in a mirror every few minutes to catch problems.
  • If the drawing is wrong the painting will fail. Better to wipe off a bad drawing and start over until the drawing is right.
  • Viva paper towels make a huge difference when wiping off paint…they remove paint better, don’t shred or leave paper crumbs. (I know because I wiped off my drawings many times during the class and when she gave me a Viva paper towel to use I couldn’t believe the difference.) Use them as a painting tool to wipe out the light areas too.
  • Keep the paint really thin, barely covering the canvas, until the very end. Then add rich, thick brush strokes of white or light colors judiciously.
  • Feeling doubt? Ask “What does it need?” instead of just saying, “Something is wrong.” Compare the problem area to something that is working to help you see what’s needed.
  • Trust that the time doing sketches, prep, research for a painting counts as much as the actual painting time.
  • Don’t care about the painting itself; if it fails, focus on the experience, the exploration.

My notes include a lengthy description of her process including a list of steps and supplies. If you’d like a copy of the full file, just leave a comment with your email and I’ll send you my file, but no guarantee it will all make sense.

I’m finding that the break between the class and getting to paint again (because of all the work on my house and studio) has somehow helped what I learned to sink in. I started a portrait over (abandoning the first version from before the workshop) and it is making a big difference.

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Category:
Art theory, Ink and watercolor wash, Life in general, Outdoors/Landscape, Sketchbook Pages
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Join the conversation! 16 Comments

  1. Thank you so much for sharing these tips – I can’t wait to try them. I would love more of your notes.

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  2. Hi Jana, please send a copy of your notes. It Sometimes letting some time go by does help the learning of new techniques. Portrait painting is a real challenge for me and I’d like to do more of it.

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  3. Hello Jana, I’d also love to see the notes. I can swap, as planning on doing Peter Cox’s oil painting course at the ASL in NY (jane@janegardiner.co.uk)

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  4. Jana – thanks so much for the description of what you learned. You we’re having much more fun than I at my work conference! I’d like to see the rest of your notes from your trip.

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    • I’m sure that’s true! (Though I wish I could have met up with you while we were both in Scottsdale). I’ve sent them by separate email. (P.S. I’m sorry I missed your birthday. I thought of you but was so buried in my chaos here that I couldn’t do anything. Let’s have a birthday celebration soon.) Jana

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  5. Hi Jana,
    I enjoy your blog. You are very generous in sharing your art journey, thank you!
    I would love to see the rest of your notes.
    Ellen

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  6. Thanks for sharing your notes. I’d love to try to make sense of the rest of your notes! It sounds as though this was one of those life changing workshops!

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  7. Hi Jana,
    The notes you shared are great and ones that I’ll use starting my next painting; I would love to see your other notes also – sounds like everyone does. You’re very generous to share your hard work with others and it’s much appreciated.
    Twinkle

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  8. Hi Jana,
    I’d love a copy of your notes ~ I can live vicariously while gleaning some useful tidbits. YAY! BTW, I’m getting up my nerve to bind a watercolor journal using your very beautifully, detailed instructions! Can’t wait.
    Thanks,
    Mary Lawler

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  9. I have a teaching video from Rose Frantzen–my substitute for an actual in-person workshop–so I’d love to have more tips and notes that you’ve collected. Thank you so much for doing this!

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    • Thanks Nita, I too have her video and love it. But the class is so, so, so, much more. I’ve sent you (and the others who requested it) the notes by separate email.

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  10. Please, please send me the notes also…. pretty please.

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  11. Jana, Sounds like the workshop with Rose was a real inspiration and I would love to receive all your notes, thank you.

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  12. Love the watercolor of the view from your hotel!

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