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Wildflowers

Wildflowers

I needed to slow down a bit today so after telecommuting this morning, I took a sandwich out to my backyard, read for a while and had a lovely half hour nap in the perfect high-70s breezy sunshine. In one corner of my yard I have a small patch of pretty wildflowers that my friend Barbara gave me in May as little unidentified seedlings. I think the bell-shaped flowers with the thicker green stems in the back are penstemons, but I have no idea what the red-stemmed more delicate ones are in front.

I did the drawing with a new brown Micron Pigma in my watercolor Moleskine and then added watercolor. I really like the way the brown pen lines look. When I started drawing I saw flowers, leaves, and stems. But with each minute of drawing I started noticing more–funny little buds, squigglies, sprouties, spirals, tiny fuzzy bean-like thingees, open mouths, pointy things, rough things, shiny things.

My favorite thing about drawing is when the words go away and it’s all about shapes and colors and light. Then whole worlds of detail and specificity open up where at first there was just one named thing, like “a plant.” Here’s a little close up detail view of the same picture (click to enlarge).

Wildrlowers-detail

6 replies on “Wildflowers”

LOVELY, jana!! And 70s???!!!! It’ll hit 100 today — we’re watering the plants we put in the ground last night by the light of the trucks until 10 pm …. I AM SO JEALOUS!!! lol

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From the details of the painting, it seems that the flowers are one of the Clarkias, Elegant Clarkia, I think. They are beautiful. I went out and looked cosely at the ones in my yard. I don’t think I have the patience to draw them. What little squigglies do you draw and which ones do you leave out to avoid confusion?

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Your drawing is lovely. You should post it to the botanicalart group, too!

Wow, 70’s! Haven’t seen that here in Texas in months…116 today. Wish I was in San Francisco!!

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I can absolutely relate to how the details of a plant seem to multiply once you stop dismissing it as a category and start to actually observe the individual nature of that plant. Very nice sketch!

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